Teaching Methodolgy

 25 Hours

Minimum Contact Hours: 15 hours

Minimum Contact Hours w/ Lead Trainer(s): 10 hours

Special Requirement: A maximum of five of the above hours can be counted on the subject of business aspects of teaching yoga

Topics in this category could include, but may not be limited to:

  • Communication skills such as group dynamics, time management, and the establishment of priorities and boundaries

  • How to address the specific needs of individuals and special populations, to the degree possible in a group setting

  • Principles of demonstration, observation, assisting and correcting

  • Teaching styles

  • Qualities of a teacher

  • The student learning process

  • Business aspects of teaching yoga (including marketing and legal

The Teaching Methodology category covers a broad overview and analysis of teaching methods, rather than how to practice or teach specific techniques. See the example topics below to help clarify the differences between the Techniques, Training and Practice category and the Teaching Methodology category:

Example Techniques, Training and Practice Topics Example Teaching Methodology Topics.

The Five Categories of Asana: The trainee will practice and learn the key poses in each category of asana (standing poses, forward bends, backbends, twists, and inversions) and will begin to develop a relationship to both the form and the function of these different categories.

Maps of Alignment: Trainees will achieve comprehension of the alignment maps for each of the five categories of asanas through observation and experience of how the poses in each category share a common foundation, and how to build upon this foundation.

Principles of Demonstrating

 

Asanas: Discuss how effective demonstrations in class can help emphasize an alignment or other focus for the specific pose or sequence of poses.

Learning Modalities: identifying your dominant style, and learning how to teach based on others’ learning styles

Use of Language and Voice: Lecture and discussion on active vs. passive language and the effective use of each; positive and conscious communication, and habitual speech and communication patterns